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Maytag Oven Temperature Not Accurate

The part(s) or condition(s) listed below for the symptom Oven temperature not accurate are ordered from most likely to least likely to occur. Check or test each item, starting with the items at the top of the page.

Most Frequent Causes for Oven temperature not accurate

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Cause 1Bake Element

When the bake element is heating properly, it glows red hot. If the element does not glow red, this indicates that the element is not heating. Often, if the heating element has burned out, it will be visibly damaged. Inspect the heating element for holes or blisters. To determine if the bake element has burned out, use a multimeter to test the element for continuity. If the bake element does not have continuity, replace it.

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Cause 2Control Board

An oven's control board will often be used to send voltage to the bake and broil elements or the igniters to heat the oven to the designated temperature. When a temperature sensor senses that the oven has reached the appropriate temperature, the control board should shut off the voltage to the heating circuit. If the control board is defective, the voltage may be shut off too early or not at all, resulting in an inaccurate oven temperature. You should test the temperature sensor and other components first before considering replacing the control board. If you confirm the other components are working properly, you can inspect the board for signs of damage or a shorted component. You can also use a multimeter to test for voltage reaching the bake or broil elements or igniters after reviewing the appliance's wiring diagram.

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Cause 3Oven calibration needed

The first thing to consider is that oven temperature will fluctuate throughout the cooking process. This is normal. To verify oven temperature, it is best to use a digital thermometer with the wire lead end touching a cast iron skillet to keep the temperature reading even. You can use a dial thermometer, but they are slow to react and are not as accurate as a digital one. Heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Let the oven cycle on and off for at least 20 minutes. Check the temperature. If the oven temperature is over or under by 35 degrees Fahrenheit the oven thermostat, oven sensor, or oven control (depending on the model), is likely bad. If the temperature is within 35 degrees above or below the set temperature, it can likely be recalibrated succcessfully. Refer to your owner's manual.

Cause 4Igniter

The igniter draws electrical current through the gas valve to open it. As the igniter weakens over time, it takes longer to open the gas valve. As a result, the oven temperature will drop too low before the burner reignites. The oven temperature should not drop more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit before the igniter relights the burner.

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Cause 5Control Module

A gas oven's control module will often be used to send voltage to the igniters to heat the oven to the designated temperature. When a temperature sensor senses that the oven has reached the appropriate temperature, the control module should shut off the voltage to the heating circuit. If the module is defective, the voltage may be shut off too early or not at all, resulting in an inaccurate oven temperature. You should test the temperature sensor and other components first before considering replacing the control module. If you confirm the other components are working properly, you can inspect the module for signs of damage or a shorted component. You can also use a multimeter to test for voltage reaching the igniters after reviewing the appliance's wiring diagram.

Parts
Cause 6Spark Module

For gas ovens using a spark igniter, a faulty spark module could be responsible for the oven not heating. If you do not see a spark near the bake or broiler burner tube when the oven is turned on, use a multimeter to determine if voltage is reaching the spark module. If power is present, the spark module is likely defective and will need to be replaced.

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Cause 7Ignition Module

For gas ovens using a spark igniter, a faulty ignition module could be responsible for the oven only heating intermittently, resulting in an inaccurate oven temperature. If you do not consistently see a spark near the bake or broiler burner tube when the oven is turned on, use a multimeter to determine if voltage is reaching the ignition module. If power is present, the ignition module is likely defective and will need to be replaced.

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Cause 8Burner Tube

If the bake burner tube is deformed or corroded, it may not be able to heat the oven evenly. Inspect the tube for corrosion or damage and replace if necessary.

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Cause 9Bake or Broil Spark Electrode

For broil burner ignition an oven broiler burner spark electrode is used to ignite the gas. The electrode is a device that sits right next to the broil burner. It functions like a spark plug. As power is applied to it a spark jumps from the spark electrode tip to the to the electrode shield, igniting the gas. If the electrode is broken or worn out the spark may not occur. Visually inspect the electrode assembly for cracks in the porcelain housing or damage to the electrode tip itself. Be aware that a proper ground and the correct polarity of the incoming voltage to the range is necessary for the electrode control to sense the presence of a flame once the burner is ignited. If the burner goes off after ignition check for proper ground and the correct polarity at the wall outlet.

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Cause 10Broil Element

The broil element may have burned out. When the broil element is heating properly, it glows red hot. If the element does not glow red, this indicates that the element is not heating. Often, if the element has burned out, it will be visibly damaged. Inspect the broil element for holes or blisters. To determine if the broil element has burned out, use a multimeter to test the element for continuity. If the broil element does not have continuity, replace it.

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Cause 11Main Control Board

A range's main control board will often be used to send voltage to the bake and broil elements or the igniters to heat the oven to the designated temperature. When a temperature sensor senses that the oven has reached the appropriate temperature, the control board should shut off the voltage to the heating circuit. If the control board is defective, the voltage may be shut off too early or not at all, resulting in an inaccurate oven temperature. You should test the temperature sensor and other components first before considering replacing the control board. If you confirm the other components are working properly, you can inspect the board for signs of damage or a shorted component. You can also use a multimeter to test for voltage reaching the bake or broil elements or igniters after reviewing the appliance's wiring diagram.

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Cause 12Temperature Control Thermostat

The temperature control thermostat monitors the temperature inside the oven and cycles on the heat when the oven temperature gets too low. If the temperature control thermostat is not calibrated correctly, it won't cycle on the heat at the proper time. As a result, the oven temperature might be too high or too low. Due to its complexity, the thermostat is very difficult to test.

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Cause 13Temperature Sensor

The oven sensor works in conjunction with the oven control board to regulate the temperature. The sensor regulates the oven temperature by varying its resistance to electrical current as the oven temperature varies. As the oven temperature rises, the oven sensor creates greater resistance. If the sensor gives the wrong amount of resistance, the oven may not bake evenly. On some models, you can recalibrate the oven control up to 35 degrees Fahrenheit higher or lower. Refer to your owner’s manual for instructions on how to recalibrate the oven control.

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Cause 14Oven Control Board

The oven control board works in conjunction with the oven sensor to regulate the temperature. The sensor regulates the oven temperature by varying its resistance to electrical current as the oven temperature varies. As the oven temperature rises, the oven sensor creates greater resistance. If the sensor gives the wrong amount of resistance, the oven may not bake evenly. Or if the oven control board does not read the sensor resistance correctly, the oven temperature may be inaccurate. On some models, you can recalibrate the oven control up to 35 degrees Fahrenheit higher or lower. Refer to your owner’s manual for instructions on how to recalibrate the oven control.

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Cause 15Convection Element

In a convection oven, the convection element works with the other heating elements to heat the air circulating inside the oven. If the convection element is burned out, the oven won’t heat evenly. To determine if the convection element is burned out, use a multimeter to test the element for continuity. If the convection element does not have continuity, replace it.

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Cause 16Convection Motor

In a convection oven, the convection motor drives the convection fan to circulate the air inside the oven. If the convection fan isn't circulating the air, the oven won't bake evenly. Try turning the convection fan blade by hand. If the blade is hard to turn, this may indicate that the motor bearings are worn. If the motor bearings are worn, you will have to replace the convection motor. To determine if the motor is defective, use a multimeter to test it for continuity. If the motor does not have continuity, replace it.

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